Webvent

Business-Relevant Ways to Convey Learning Impact to Executives

Thursday, August 15, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT  
Host: Association for Talent Development
By: Jeffrey Berk, COO, KnowledgeAdvisors

Regularly producing learning impact data that tells a story to executive stakeholders requires creativity. Get insights on how to effectively produce this data, plus tips on how best to share this data with executives. You'll uncover specific learning impact techniques, identify highly effective ways to convey data, see relevant examples, and understand some common metric errors. You will also learn about a next-generation movement in executive reporting and talent development reporting principles, created by a group of senior CLOs.

We will:

  • Briefly describe practical approaches to measuring learning impact.
  • Explain how to convey impact in credible ways to executives.
  • Provide additional examples that articulate impact in common-sense ways.
  • Identify common metric errors that should be avoided when talking to executives.
  • Provide an overview of the talent development reporting principles movement.
     

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Presenter

Jeffrey Berk
Jeffrey Berk

COO, KnowledgeAdvisors

Jeffrey Berk, COO KnowledgeAdvisors


Jeffrey Berk is responsible for managing the internal and customer-facing operations of the business, and formulating strategic solutions. He led the benchmarking group at Andersen prior to joining KnowledgeAdvisors, and he brings a deep level of expertise in measurement and benchmarking. Jeffrey is a certified public accountant, holds an MBA from the University of Chicago, and is an adjunct professor at Loyola University of Chicago.


Sponsors

  • KnowledgeAdvisors

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